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Water and sanitation services
that last eUpdate: 

News and updates on WASH services that last, the life-cycle costs approach, and monitoring sustainable WASH service delivery
July-August 2013

Dear colleagues,
 
Welcome to the July-August edition of our eUpdate! Many of you joined this mailing list five years ago, others more recently. Through WASHCost, we had made great strides in detailing the costs of WASH and emphasising the significance of monitoring WASH service levels. In the coming months, the WASHCost project will come to a close—but through you and your organisations' application (and adaptation) of a life-cycle costs approach, we are confident that WASHCost's work will continue, to achieve sustainable, lasting and equitable WASH services.

In the final months of the WASHCost project, we commissioned an independent evaluation team to conduct the End-of-Project Evaluation of WASHCost's achievements, and to reflect on the lessons learnt from the project.  Led by Piers Cross, the evaluation was supported by José Frade, A.J. James and Sophie Trémolet. We are pleased to announce that the evaluation report is now available online. It evaluates the work and progress made in each of WASHCost's four focus countries: Burkina Faso, Ghana, India (Andhra Pradesh) and Mozambique and provides a global assessment at international level.

The entire WASHCost team is immensely grateful for your interest on the difficult issue of costs and monitoring, for your challenging engagement with us, and for the continuous feedback we received from many of you through the years. We want to keep hearing from you and will keep you abreast with the latest analyses, upcoming materials and publications on a life-cycle costs approach. We also invite you to view a 20-minute documentary on WASHCost and short country thematic videos here.

With a better grasp of how much WASH costs, we now need to search for some good answers to the question of “financing”—more on this topic in the coming years.
In the meantime, we encourage you to share this newsletter widely.

Kind regards,
Catarina Fonseca
WASHCost Project Director
IRC Senior Programme Officer


FEATURING: 
WATER SERVICES THAT LAST
1.     Bridging the gap between districts and communities
In Uganda, new water and sanitation boards at sub-county level are designed to remedy the problem of lack of capacity in water user committees—making local management more professional and effective. More

2.    Water boards need cash – and gumboots!
Sub-counties in Uganda's Kabarole District are excited about the potential of their new water and sanitation boards. But without financing, how can that potential be realised? More

3.    Hand pump mechanics get organised to keep water flowing
Uganda is establishing Hand Pump Mechanics Associations as a solution to low functionality of rural point sources. Do these associations bring better, more professional service to communities? More

4.    Akatsi South District undertakes ‘user satisfaction survey’
An earlier survey on functionality of water systems in Ghana’s Akatsi South District looked at how service providers performed. Now it was time to find out what users thought of the service they were getting. More

5.    Sector learning necessary in addressing WASH service delivery challenges.
Ghana has taken another step towards decentralised sector learning with the launch of the country’s third regional learning alliance platform. For the Brong Ahafo region this should result in the better use of research and scaling-up of innovation. More

6.   Akatsi North District Assembly makes progress towards improved water facility functionality
High-level officials pledged to get handpumps repaired in Ghana’s Akatsi North District after following a workshop on Service Delivery Approach (SDA) and Life Cycle Cost Approach (LCCA). So far 11 out 20 broken handpumps are working again. More

7.    CWSA meet stakeholders on sustaining water service delivery: innovations and partnerships for scaling up
Now Ghana’s Community Water and Sanitation Agency (CWSA) has officially adopted the Service Delivery Approach (SDA), it will be easier to scale-up innovations. These range from sector harmonisation to SMS technology and monitoring dashboards. More

8.    Designing strategies for municipal monitoring of public water services in Burkina Faso
What and how should municipalities be monitoring? How can they put the results to good use?. These were the main questions debated during a series of workshops held in Ouagadougou. More  
 
SANITATION AND HYGIENE SERVICES THAT LAST
9.    Getting hygiene messages with your tea
Tea stalls are a common phenomenon in Bangladesh, it is a place where people gather not just for tea, but to hang out and talk freely about whatever is important to them. Ingeborg Krukkert reports how male field workers in the BRAC WASH programme have started visiting these stalls to discuss sanitation and hygiene practices. More

10.   Full-chain sanitation services that last
2.6 billion people are waiting for a toilet and the faecal sludge of an additional 1.5 billion people never gets treated.  IRC has launched a framework on how to tackle the problem of non-sewered sanitation.  Co-author Joep Verhagen invites everyone to contribute by commenting on the framework and by sharing lessons learnt. More
 
MONITORING SUSTAINABLE WASH SERVICE DELIVERY
11.   Monitoring
On our monitoring building block page, you'll find publications, opinion, news, videos, case studies and more. Check it out

12.   Ghana’s Sunyani West District embarks on second round data collection on functionality and service level
Local government staff have been trained to use smart phones to collect monitoring data. Several challenges emerged when staff tried out the phones in the field. More

13.   At the start of true scale in monitoring
The SMARTerWASH project has started in Ghana. It is big, says Ton Schouten. Some 780 people will be trained and thousands of water systems will be mapped and services monitored. More

14.   Monitoring for learning and developing capacities in WASH
How does WASH monitoring contribute to building sector capacities and improving service delivery? Carmen da Silva presents the experience of developing a country-wide system for monitoring rural water supplies in Uganda and in Honduras. More

15.   Error 503: Service not available
Honduras is piloting a web-based monitoring system for rural water and sanitation. But what real use is such a system, wonders Andrés Gil, if there is no Internet connection and monitoring data is not being used for planning. More
 
WASHCOST AND THE LIFE-CYCLE COSTS APPROACH
16.   WASHCost end-of-project evaluation
WASHCost “has been a bold, global attempt to gain accurate knowledge on disaggregated water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) costs in rural and peri-urban areas”. What has been learnt and how can these lessons be translated into more sustainable services? More

17.   Road Map WASHCost Calculator
The launch of the WASHCost Calculator 1.0 is expected in October 2013. Have a quick glimpse of the road map. More

18.   WASHCost film series live
Interested to know how WASHCost has dealt with the issue of sustaining rural and peri-urban water, sanitation and hygiene services in Ghana, India, Mozambique and Burkina-Faso? Check out the four country films, the twenty minute feature film and the cool animation. More

19.   LCCA Training at Akatsi District-Volta Region
Building district level capacity for sustainable water service delivery is a key aim of Ghana’s  Community Water and Sanitation Agency (CWSA) and the Triple-S project. So when they organise training, they make sure high-profile local government officials attend. More
 
BLOG ENTRIES
20.   What is good enough? Defining a “basic service level” for WASH in schools
Implementers and funders want to know how much it costs to provide sustainable WASH services for schools. Using the WASHCost life-cycle cost methodology as a starting point, IRC's Catarina Fonseca has been to Bangladesh to develop and test a service ladder, criteria and indicators for WASH in schools in the BRAC WASH Programme. More

21.   USAID’s new water strategy – when the numbers don’t add up
The long-awaited USAID water strategy has a clear focus on water and sanitation and gives due attention to monitoring and capacity building. What’s disappointing, according to Harold Lockwood, is that the target numbers for access to water and sanitation facilities are remarkably low and that there are no indicators for sustainability. More

22.   Paris, s’éveille – waking up to the Paris Declaration
The rural WASH sector in Honduras illustrates how messy aid to the sector sometimes can be. Stef Smits proposes some small steps that can be taken to clean up things in line with the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness. More

23.   1st WASHTech webinar attracts 25 participants and lots of questions
How do you know which WASH technology is worth investing in for your part of the country? The Technology Applicability Framework (TAF), developed by the WASHTech project, will help you find the answer. More

EVENTS
24.   Changing relationships: ICT to improve water governance, seminar convened by IRC and partners at the Stockholm World Water Week
How can ICT improve transparency, accountability and the quality of water services? Are we being diverted by the allure of emerging technologies from the real issues of data integrity and the improvement of services? These questions, and more, will be addressed in this seminar on 4 September 2013 at World Water Week in Stockholm 2013. More

25.   West Africa Learning and Exchange Workshop “Towards sustainable total sanitation”
This workshop targets sanitation practitioners that have hands-on experience with the implementation of Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) programmes in West Africa. IRC, UNICEF, WaterAid and SNV are organising this workshop from 12-14 November 2013 in Cotonou, Benin. More

26.   Training: From water infrastructure to water services that last: Putting it into practice
Note: dates have changed from 9-13 September to 25-29 November 2013
This five-day course in Amsterdam, The Netherlands will help senior water sector professionals understand the key elements of delivering sustainable rural water services at scale. It provides examples and models from various countries and draws on the latest thinking from Triple-S. More
 
27.   Costing sustainable services: Free online course
The course will assist governments, NGOs, donors and individuals to plan and budget for sustainable and equitable WASH services, using a life-cycle cost approach. At this moment more than 1,000 sector professionals have signed up for the online training. Register here to book your spot!

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Copyright © 2013 IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you are part of IRC's WASHCost & Triple-S mailing list.
Our mailing address is:

IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre

PO Box 82327

Den Haag, ZH 2508

Netherlands

 

Water and sanitation services
that last eUpdate: 
News and updates on WASH services that last, the life-cycle costs approach, and monitoring sustainable WASH service delivery
July-August 2013
Dear colleagues,
 
Welcome to the July-August edition of our eUpdate! Many of you joined this mailing list five years ago, others more recently. Through WASHCost, we had made great strides in detailing the costs of WASH and emphasising the significance of monitoring WASH service levels. In the coming months, the WASHCost project will come to a close—but through you and your organisations' application (and adaptation) of a life-cycle costs approach, we are confident that WASHCost's work will continue, to achieve sustainable, lasting and equitable WASH services.

In the final months of the WASHCost project, we commissioned an independent evaluation team to conduct the End-of-Project Evaluation of WASHCost's achievements, and to reflect on the lessons learnt from the project.  Led by Piers Cross, the evaluation was supported by José Frade, A.J. James and Sophie Trémolet. We are pleased to announce that the evaluation report is now available online. It evaluates the work and progress made in each of WASHCost's four focus countries: Burkina Faso, Ghana, India (Andhra Pradesh) and Mozambique and provides a global assessment at international level.

The entire WASHCost team is immensely grateful for your interest on the difficult issue of costs and monitoring, for your challenging engagement with us, and for the continuous feedback we received from many of you through the years. We want to keep hearing from you and will keep you abreast with the latest analyses, upcoming materials and publications on a life-cycle costs approach. We also invite you to view a 20-minute documentary on WASHCost and short country thematic videos here.

With a better grasp of how much WASH costs, we now need to search for some good answers to the question of “financing”—more on this topic in the coming years.
In the meantime, we encourage you to share this newsletter widely.

Kind regards,
Catarina Fonseca
WASHCost Project Director
IRC Senior Programme Officer


FEATURING: 
WATER SERVICES THAT LAST
1.     Bridging the gap between districts and communities
In Uganda, new water and sanitation boards at sub-county level are designed to remedy the problem of lack of capacity in water user committees—making local management more professional and effective. More

2.    Water boards need cash – and gumboots!
Sub-counties in Uganda's Kabarole District are excited about the potential of their new water and sanitation boards. But without financing, how can that potential be realised? More

3.    Hand pump mechanics get organised to keep water flowing
Uganda is establishing Hand Pump Mechanics Associations as a solution to low functionality of rural point sources. Do these associations bring better, more professional service to communities? More

4.    Akatsi South District undertakes ‘user satisfaction survey’
An earlier survey on functionality of water systems in Ghana’s Akatsi South District looked at how service providers performed. Now it was time to find out what users thought of the service they were getting. More

5.    Sector learning necessary in addressing WASH service delivery challenges.
Ghana has taken another step towards decentralised sector learning with the launch of the country’s third regional learning alliance platform. For the Brong Ahafo region this should result in the better use of research and scaling-up of innovation. More

6.   Akatsi North District Assembly makes progress towards improved water facility functionality
High-level officials pledged to get handpumps repaired in Ghana’s Akatsi North District after following a workshop on Service Delivery Approach (SDA) and Life Cycle Cost Approach (LCCA). So far 11 out 20 broken handpumps are working again. More

7.    CWSA meet stakeholders on sustaining water service delivery: innovations and partnerships for scaling up
Now Ghana’s Community Water and Sanitation Agency (CWSA) has officially adopted the Service Delivery Approach (SDA), it will be easier to scale-up innovations. These range from sector harmonisation to SMS technology and monitoring dashboards. More

8.    Designing strategies for municipal monitoring of public water services in Burkina Faso
What and how should municipalities be monitoring? How can they put the results to good use?. These were the main questions debated during a series of workshops held in Ouagadougou. More  
 
SANITATION AND HYGIENE SERVICES THAT LAST
9.    Getting hygiene messages with your tea
Tea stalls are a common phenomenon in Bangladesh, it is a place where people gather not just for tea, but to hang out and talk freely about whatever is important to them. Ingeborg Krukkert reports how male field workers in the BRAC WASH programme have started visiting these stalls to discuss sanitation and hygiene practices. More

10.   Full-chain sanitation services that last
2.6 billion people are waiting for a toilet and the faecal sludge of an additional 1.5 billion people never gets treated.  IRC has launched a framework on how to tackle the problem of non-sewered sanitation.  Co-author Joep Verhagen invites everyone to contribute by commenting on the framework and by sharing lessons learnt. More
 
MONITORING SUSTAINABLE WASH SERVICE DELIVERY
11.   Monitoring
On our monitoring building block page, you'll find publications, opinion, news, videos, case studies and more. Check it out

12.   Ghana’s Sunyani West District embarks on second round data collection on functionality and service level
Local government staff have been trained to use smart phones to collect monitoring data. Several challenges emerged when staff tried out the phones in the field. More

13.   At the start of true scale in monitoring
The SMARTerWASH project has started in Ghana. It is big, says Ton Schouten. Some 780 people will be trained and thousands of water systems will be mapped and services monitored. More

14.   Monitoring for learning and developing capacities in WASH
How does WASH monitoring contribute to building sector capacities and improving service delivery? Carmen da Silva presents the experience of developing a country-wide system for monitoring rural water supplies in Uganda and in Honduras. More

15.   Error 503: Service not available
Honduras is piloting a web-based monitoring system for rural water and sanitation. But what real use is such a system, wonders Andrés Gil, if there is no Internet connection and monitoring data is not being used for planning. More
 
WASHCOST AND THE LIFE-CYCLE COSTS APPROACH
16.   WASHCost end-of-project evaluation
WASHCost “has been a bold, global attempt to gain accurate knowledge on disaggregated water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) costs in rural and peri-urban areas”. What has been learnt and how can these lessons be translated into more sustainable services? More

17.   Road Map WASHCost Calculator
The launch of the WASHCost Calculator 1.0 is expected in October 2013. Have a quick glimpse of the road map. More

18.   WASHCost film series live
Interested to know how WASHCost has dealt with the issue of sustaining rural and peri-urban water, sanitation and hygiene services in Ghana, India, Mozambique and Burkina-Faso? Check out the four country films, the twenty minute feature film and the cool animation. More

19.   LCCA Training at Akatsi District-Volta Region
Building district level capacity for sustainable water service delivery is a key aim of Ghana’s  Community Water and Sanitation Agency (CWSA) and the Triple-S project. So when they organise training, they make sure high-profile local government officials attend. More
 
BLOG ENTRIES
20.   What is good enough? Defining a “basic service level” for WASH in schools
Implementers and funders want to know how much it costs to provide sustainable WASH services for schools. Using the WASHCost life-cycle cost methodology as a starting point, IRC's Catarina Fonseca has been to Bangladesh to develop and test a service ladder, criteria and indicators for WASH in schools in the BRAC WASH Programme. More

21.   USAID’s new water strategy – when the numbers don’t add up
The long-awaited USAID water strategy has a clear focus on water and sanitation and gives due attention to monitoring and capacity building. What’s disappointing, according to Harold Lockwood, is that the target numbers for access to water and sanitation facilities are remarkably low and that there are no indicators for sustainability. More

22.   Paris, s’éveille – waking up to the Paris Declaration
The rural WASH sector in Honduras illustrates how messy aid to the sector sometimes can be. Stef Smits proposes some small steps that can be taken to clean up things in line with the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness. More

23.   1st WASHTech webinar attracts 25 participants and lots of questions
How do you know which WASH technology is worth investing in for your part of the country? The Technology Applicability Framework (TAF), developed by the WASHTech project, will help you find the answer. More

EVENTS
24.   Changing relationships: ICT to improve water governance, seminar convened by IRC and partners at the Stockholm World Water Week
How can ICT improve transparency, accountability and the quality of water services? Are we being diverted by the allure of emerging technologies from the real issues of data integrity and the improvement of services? These questions, and more, will be addressed in this seminar on 4 September 2013 at World Water Week in Stockholm 2013. More

25.   West Africa Learning and Exchange Workshop “Towards sustainable total sanitation”
This workshop targets sanitation practitioners that have hands-on experience with the implementation of Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) programmes in West Africa. IRC, UNICEF, WaterAid and SNV are organising this workshop from 12-14 November 2013 in Cotonou, Benin. More

26.   Training: From water infrastructure to water services that last: Putting it into practice
Note: dates have changed from 9-13 September to 25-29 November 2013
This five-day course in Amsterdam, The Netherlands will help senior water sector professionals understand the key elements of delivering sustainable rural water services at scale. It provides examples and models from various countries and draws on the latest thinking from Triple-S. More
 
27.   Costing sustainable services: Free online course
The course will assist governments, NGOs, donors and individuals to plan and budget for sustainable and equitable WASH services, using a life-cycle cost approach. At this moment more than 1,000 sector professionals have signed up for the online training. Register here to book your spot!
Copyright © 2013 IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you are part of IRC's WASHCost & Triple-S mailing list.
Our mailing address is:
IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre
PO Box 82327
Den Haag, ZH 2508
Netherlands
 
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